Mission
Our mission is to become a world-leading organisation in integrated interdisciplinary transport research and development. We work with industry and government to investigate sustainable approaches to transport infrastructure and operations.
Staff
The team at rCITI consists of core staff, visiting academics and postgraduate students. We have been successful in recruiting some high-calibre, globally experienced transport staff with research interests across the field of transport systems and infrastructure. And the numbers are growing.
Research
Our aim is to undertake high level, integrated interdisciplinary transport research and development that can quickly be applied to real life scenarios and make a real difference. Whether it’s taking a more sustainable approach to infrastructure and operations or optimising performance of systems or vehicles, we create knowledge, technologies and tools to understand and improve transport systems.

Latest News & Events

Prof. S. Travis Waller
24 November 2014

The rCITI team forwards their congratulations to Prof S. Travis Waller for winning an 2015 Discovery Grant for the project titled "Adaptive Stochastic Dynamic Traffic Assignment"

Group
20 November 2014

The F20 is an initiative of the Embassy of France in Australia to highlight 20 French-Australian cultural events held in 2014.

Profile - Prof Travis Waller

How maths can save our roads

Professor Travis Waller

Tired of Sydney's traffic congestion? Studying maths might be the answer, as Professor Travis Waller, Director of the UNSW Research Centre for Integrated Transport Innovation, explains in this teaser for Maths is Awesome week on ScienceAlert.

Profile - Dr Vinayak Dixit

vinayak dixit profile

Dr Vinayak Dixit, previously the Associate Director of Research, Gulf Coast Research Center for Evacuation and Transportation Resiliency at Louisiana State University, has a keen interest in topics such as planning for risk in transportation and emergency evacuation and management.

Profiles of Students

Profile - Kiran Shakeel

Kiran Shakeel

Kiran Shakeel completed her BE in Civil Engineering overseas then worked for more than four years in a transportation and engineering department. Later she decided to do further study in novel methods of managing the traffic demand on road networks, so applied to UNSW to do her Masters by Research.

Profile - Tao Wen

Tao Wen

Tao Wen’s research mainly focuses on estimating transportation demand based on observed traffic flows, which is one of the four fundamental of steps of transportation planning. He is working on a model which can make full use of complex traffic data and make reliable predictions of demand.

Profile - Sisi Jian

Sisi Jian

Sisi Jian is studying the idea of ‘carshare’ and its impact on urban mobility. She’s using data to try to improve the ‘carshare’ model to make it more accessible to more people. This is part of a broader traffic strategy that is aimed at improving our quality of life through better transport.

Profile - Neeraj Saxena

Neeraj Saxena

Neeraj Saxena loves the challenge of applying mathematics and statistics to real world issues – like influencing how transport systems impact the economic growth of a city. His research at rCITI is looking at modelling efficient and sustainable transport systems.

Profile - Mohammad Nurul Hassan

Mohammad Nurul Hassan

After working for seven years as a transport professional and researcher at the United Arab Emirates University, Hassan decided to pursue a PhD in Transport. He discovered the dedicated transport group rCITI at UNSW School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and decided to apply.  

Profile - Milad Ghasrikhouzani

Milad Ghasrikhouzani

After a year studying as an undergraduate civil engineering student, Milad Ghasrikhouzani discovered transport engineering and was hooked. Now a PhD student, he is completely driven by how modelling short and long term decision of individuals can be applied to transport policy assessment in order to provide better transport infrastructure.

Profile - Kasun Wijayaratna

Kasun Wijayaratna

Most existing traffic models are based on normal traffic conditions. Recognising this, Kasun Wijayaratna has decided to get a better understanding of driver behaviour in disrupted conditions – such as an accident, a breakdown or flooding – and integrate his finding into existing traffic models.

Profile - Edward Robson

Edward Robson

All his life Ted Robson loved building things, spending countless hours playing with lego, drawing maps and planning cities in SimCity. After studying Engineering and Commerce with designs on being a Transport Planner, Ted started working in the field, and soon realised he needed more theory to back up his ideas. Since then he has begun his PhD and hasn’t looked back.

Profile - Divya Jayakumar Nair

Divya Jayakumar Nair

With thousands of tons of fresh food thrown into landfill each year by the food industry, Divya Nair is dedicating herself to ironing out the logistical risks and uncertainties in the complex process food rescue and redistribution. Her research is set to make a real difference in many areas.

Profile - David Arbis

Profile - David Arbis

David Arbis has taken his fascination with human behaviour to the next level, doing his PhD in the effects of behaviour on systems of traffic and transportation, particularly with regards to safety.   He recently presented his ideas at a conference in Washington D.C.

Profile - Asif Hassan

Asif Hassan

Communication systems are improving rapidly, and most drivers use their mobile phones in the transport space for numerous purposes. However when Asif Hassan’s friend was almost killed in a head-on collision because he was using his mobile phone, he was inspired to understand more.

Profile - Tuo Mao

Tuo Mao

Tuo Mao was drawn to smart traffic management and control because it is a broad field encompassing a combination of computer science and transport engineering. He is currently undertaking his PhD in transport network modelling and optimisation and hopes his research will contribute to a better transport system for everyone.

Profile - Xiang Zhang

Xiang Zhang

Since he was a child, Xiang Zhang dreamt of being an expert in transport engineering – so after undergraduate and postgraduate study in transport in China, he has landed at UNSW to do his PhD. He is looking at transportation network design problems to do with the environment, equity and unpredictability.

Profile - Xun Li

Xun Li

Transport affects everyone’s daily life, so transportation planners and system operators need to consider the issues of equity carefully when they make decisions. However equity in transport is under-researched. Recognising this, Xun Li is focusing his PhD research on equity issues in transportation systems.

Profile - Alex Karki

Alex Karki

Traffic Engineer, Alex Karki never thought he would be back at UNSW again after his undergraduate degree, but when the university established a world class research centre in traffic engineering (rCITI) he was determined to fill in the research gaps in  the parking and traffic issues faced by local government.

Profile - Abdulmajeed Alsultan

Abdulmajeed Alsultan

Abdulmajeed is using transport modelling software to understand problems like traffic congestion, pollution, and high accident rates. He plans to use the skills and knowledge he gains through his PhD to contribute to improvements in the transport system in his home country, Saudi Arabia. 

Profile - Mohana Naga Sai Chand Chakka

Sai Chand

From as far back as he can remember, Sai was fascinated by the transport system in India. So a PhD in transport came as no shock to his family. He chose UNSW Australia because of the dedicated transport research centre (rCITI) where he surrounds himself with like-minded transport innovators.

Profile - Alireza Ahmadian Fard Fini

Alireza Ahmadian Fard Fini

After ten years working on large-scale construction projects Alireza decided there had to be a better way. He is doing his PhD looking at how to apply new theories and innovations to improve the efficiency of the construction industry.

Profile - Seul Ki Lee

Seul Ki Lee

Every year, 1.24 million people die on the roads, and 50 million are injured. Despite the increase in vehicle safety and communication systems, after having been in several road incidents himself, Seul Ki Lee decided to explore the reasons for these horrific statistics through a PhD at rCITI.